We know Valentine’s Day is a Hallmark holiday, created mostly to sell cards and flowers. But are we going to let that stop us from celebrating and understanding love? Not on your life.

That’s because love is what makes the world go ‘round—not only in song and movies, but in science, too. According to psychologists like Barbara Fredrickson, love is the supreme emotion, coming out of our evolutionary need to connect with others for survival. Of course, how Fredrickson defines love is not exactly romantic. To her, love entails:

  • A sharing of one or more positive emotions between you and another;
  • A synchrony between your and the other person’s biochemistry and behaviors;
  • A reflected motive to invest in each other’s well-being that brings mutual care.

This view of love isn’t restricted to romance. Many studies suggest the sense of care and connection she describes is worth cultivating in every moment and domain of your life—even with strangers.

If you want to expand your capacity for love, there are a number of research-tested ways to do that.

First, take the quizzes (based on scientifically validated instruments) we offer here on Greater Good to help you figure out where you’re strong and where you might need improvement in cultivating love at home and in the world. Then, below, try one of the exercises from our site Greater Good in Action. Many of them are intended to enhance ties with a romantic partner—but they can be applied to many kinds of relationships.

  • Compassionate Love Quiz

    Compassionate Love Quiz

    You might love your partner truly, madly, deeply. But do you love compassionately?

    Try It Now
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  • Relationship Trust Quiz

    Relationship Trust Quiz

    Is your relationship defined by honesty and dependability—or suspicion and betrayal?

    Try It Now
  • Love of Humanity Quiz

    Love of Humanity Quiz

    How deeply do you feel connected with all of humanity?

    Try It Now
  • 36 Questions

    36 Questions

    Overcome barriers to closeness by engaging in “reciprocal self-disclosure”

    Try It Now
  • Best Possible Self

    Best Possible Self

    This activity can help you learn about yourself and what you want.

    Try It Now
  • Capitalizing on Positive Events

    Capitalizing on Positive Events

    Enhance overall relationship satisfaction by talking about a positive event.

    Try It Now
  • Reminders of Connectedness

    Reminders of Connectedness

    How to add reminders of social connection to your home, office, or classroom.

    Try It Now
  • The Gift of Time

    The Gift of Time

    This exercise ensures that we allocate time for the important people in our lives.

    Try It Now
  • Mental Subtraction

    Mental Subtraction

    It’s easy to take people for granted. This exercise can stoke feelings of gratitude.

    Try It Now
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