Happiness at Work

Many of us probably don’t associate “happiness” with “work.”

But maybe we should: Studies suggest that happy people are actually more productive and successful, and less likely to leave their jobs.

This quiz measures how happy you are when you’re on the clock. It’s based on research that has identified key factors to happiness at work.

For the first 20 items below, please select the response that best indicates how much you agree with each statement. There are no right or wrong answers, so please respond as honestly as possible. If you are an independent contractor, when you see “organization,” bring to mind people in your profession—that is, people who do the same kind of work as you. When you see “colleague,” bring to mind people who you interact with during work, such as clients, vendors, or peers in your field.

The final six questions will help our research team see how people’s levels of happiness at work relate to factors like gender, age, and profession.

When you're done, you'll get your happiness-at-work score, along with ideas for cultivating more happiness at work.

Any responses submitted here will never be shared with any organization outside the Greater Good Science Center under any circumstances, ever. All responses are anonymized and only used in aggregate for research purposes.

Take The Quiz

1. At my work, I always persevere, even when things do not go well.

At my work, I always persevere, even when things do not go well.

2. I try my hardest to perform well and often get immersed in my work.

I try my hardest to perform well and often get immersed in my work.

3. I have a strong and reliable network of supportive colleagues at work.

I have a strong and reliable network of supportive colleagues at work.

4. I look forward to each new day at work.

I look forward to each new day at work.

5. I am true to myself at work in most situations.

I am true to myself at work in most situations.

6. At my workplace, we routinely thank each other for everyday efforts and contributions to success.

At my workplace, we routinely thank each other for everyday efforts and contributions to success.

7. I enjoy talking about my work to other people.

I enjoy talking about my work to other people.

8. The work we do in my organization serves a greater purpose.

The work we do in my organization serves a greater purpose.

9. I often ask for feedback so that I can improve my work performance.

I often ask for feedback so that I can improve my work performance.

10. I believe in giving help to my work colleagues, as well as asking for it.

I believe in giving help to my work colleagues, as well as asking for it.

11. There is a high level of trust throughout my workplace.

There is a high level of trust throughout my workplace.

12. I view my work as contributing to my personal growth.

I view my work as contributing to my personal growth.

13. The work that I do fits well with my personal values and beliefs.

The work that I do fits well with my personal values and beliefs.

14. The humor my colleagues use makes the work more enjoyable.

The humor my colleagues use makes the work more enjoyable.

15. I have developed some reliable ways to deal with the personal stress of challenging events at work.

I have developed some reliable ways to deal with the personal stress of challenging events at work.

16. I am careful to ensure that my work does not dominate my personal life.

I am careful to ensure that my work does not dominate my personal life.

17. Curiosity is the driving force behind much of what I do at work.

Curiosity is the driving force behind much of what I do at work.

18. At my work, my colleagues and I think of each other as friends.

At my work, my colleagues and I think of each other as friends.

19. The tasks I have to do at work are in line with what I really want to be doing.

The tasks I have to do at work are in line with what I really want to be doing.

20. It is easy for me to recognize the day to day progress that I am making at work.

It is easy for me to recognize the day-to-day progress that I am making at work.

21. In terms of your gender identity, do you see yourself as:

In terms of your gender identity, do you see yourself as:

22. What is your age?

What is your age?

23. Please select your ethnic background (if you identify with more than one ethnicity, select the one you identify with the most, or select multiethnic).

Please select your ethnic background (if you identify with more than one ethnicity, select the one you identify with the most, or select multiethnic).

24. Which category best describes your work?

Which category best describes your work?

25. Which of the following best describes your current (or most recent) role in your organization:

Which of the following best describes your current (or most recent) role in your organization:

26. Please provide your best estimate of your annual household income in USD (before taxes).

Please provide your best estimate of your annual household income in USD (before taxes).

Adapted from:

Amabile, T. M., Hill, K. G., Hennessey, B. A., & Tighe, E. M. (1994). The Work Preference Inventory: Assessing intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66(5), 950.

Broeck, A., Vansteenkiste, M., Witte, H., Soenens, B., & Lens, W. (2010). Capturing autonomy, competence, and relatedness at work: Construction and initial validation of the Work‐related Basic Need Satisfaction scale. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 83(4), 981–1002.

Cameron, K., Mora, C., Leutscher, T., & Calarco, M. (2011). Effects of positive practices on organizational effectiveness. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 47(3), 266–308.

Cann, A., Watson, A. J., & Bridgewater, E. A. (2014). Assessing humor at work: The Humor Climate Questionnaire. Humor, 27(2), 307–23.

Huff, L., & Kelley, L. (2003). Levels of organizational trust in individualist versus collectivist societies: A seven-nation study. Organization Science, 14(1), 81–90.

Porath, C., Spreitzer, G., Gibson, C., & Garnett, F. G. (2011). Thriving at work: Toward its measurement, construct validation, and theoretical refinement. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 33(2), 250–75.

Rich, B. L., Lepine, J. A., & Crawford, E. R. (2010). Job engagement: Antecedents and effects on job performance. Academy of Management Journal, 53(3), 617–35.

Schaufeli, W. B., Salanova, M., González-Romá, V., & Bakker, A. B. (2002). The measurement of engagement and burnout: A two sample confirmatory factor analytic approach. Journal of Happiness Studies, 3(1), 71–92.

Steger, M. F., Dik, B. J., & Duffy, R. D. (2012). Measuring meaningful work: The work and meaning inventory (WAMI). Journal of Career Assessment, 20(3), 322–37.

Van den Bosch, R., & Taris, T. W. (2014). Authenticity at work: Development and validation of an individual authenticity measure at work. Journal of Happiness Studies, 15(1), 1–18.

Winwood, P. C., Colon, R., & McEwen, K. (2013). A practical measure of workplace resilience: Developing the Resilience at Work scale. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 55(10), 1205–12.

Wrzesniewski, A., McCauley, C., Rozin, P., & Schwartz, B. (1997). Jobs, careers, and callings: People’s relations to their work. Journal of Research in Personality, 31(1), 21–33.

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