In Brief

Most Recent Story

A Simple Story Can Improve Students’ Grades in Science

By Kira M. Newman | May 27, 2016

According to a new study, reading about scientists’ struggles can help students who aren’t doing so well in science.

 
  

Past Stories

Teachers Can Reduce Suspensions by Practicing Empathy

By Mariah Flynn | May 26, 2016

According to a new study, empathic discipline cuts suspension rates in half and improves student-teacher relationships.

 

Where to Find Wisdom in the Body

By Jill Suttie | May 19, 2016

According to a new study, people with higher heart rate variability are wiser—when they make an effort to be objective.

 

Does Forgiveness Make Kids Happier?

By Sarah Wheeler | May 16, 2016

A new study suggests that children are happier when they’re more forgiving toward their friends.

 

Spending Money on Others Can Lower Your Blood Pressure

By Elizabeth Hopper | May 12, 2016

According to a new study, "prosocial spending" may be as good for your blood pressure as a healthy diet and exercise.

 

Happy People Don’t Need to Feel Superior

By Kira M. Newman | May 9, 2016

A new study suggests that happy people avoid the trap of social comparison.

 

Where Does Kindness Come From?

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas | May 5, 2016

A new study fuses methods from several different branches of science to reveal the forces that shape kindness.

 

Does Mind-Wandering Make You Less Caring?

By Hooria Jazaieri | April 25, 2016

According to a new study, how caring we are is linked to how much we pay attention to the present moment.

 

How Mindfulness Can Help Us Forgive Betrayal

By Kirra Dickinson | April 20, 2016

According to a new study, mindful people are more likely to overcome the emotional turmoil and pain of infidelity.

 

Which Feels Better, Forgiveness or Revenge?

By Kira M. Newman | April 18, 2016

A new study compares different responses to bullying—and finds that forgiveness may have to wait.

 

Can Mindfulness Help Students Cope with Failure?

By Adam Hoffman | April 5, 2016

New research suggests that mindfulness helps college students bounce back from poor performance and self-criticism.

 

Can Living in the Moment Make You a Better Parent?

By Sarah Wheeler | March 29, 2016

According to a new study, mindfulness may lead to a happier, healthier parenting experience.

 
Even male rats can use a good hug to protect themselves from the effects of stress.

Bromances Can Protect Males Under Stress

By Robert Sanders | March 10, 2016

According to a new study, male rats like to cuddle after they get stressed out.

 

What Music Looks Like in the Brain

By Jill Suttie | February 29, 2016

A new study discovers a neural circuit dedicated to music.

 

How Purity Divides Us

By Emily Gersema | February 26, 2016

A study of moral values reveals issues related to purity can determine how close—or how far—we want to be with someone in social and political circles.

 

Does Virtue or Vice Work Better in Politics?

By Kathleen Maclay | February 23, 2016

A new study examines which politicians get support for their legislation and which ones don't.

 
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and US President Barack Obama

Culture Shapes How Leaders Smile

By Clifton B. Parker | February 22, 2016

The way presidents and government officials smile depends on which emotions their culture values, a new study finds.

 

How Love Can Survive Death

By Kira M. Newman | February 12, 2016

According to a new study, the link between two partners’ well-being isn’t weakened when one passes away.

 

How Positive Thinking Can Backfire

By Nathan Collins | February 5, 2016

According to a new study, positive daydreaming may lead to depression down the road.

 

Friends Help Our Health As We Age

By Kira M. Newman | February 2, 2016

A new study suggests that the quality of adult relationships matters more to our health than their quantity.

 

Fighting Stereotypes Is Good for All Students

By Clifton B. Parker | January 28, 2016

In a new study, everyone's grades improved when African-American students felt less threatened.

 

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Kinder

By Jill Suttie | January 25, 2016

New research suggests that people who have experienced greater adversity are more empathic.

 

How Songs Help Children Bond

By Tom Jacobs | January 22, 2016

A new study suggests music plays a role in our early tendency to distinguish friend from foe.

 

Why Parents Sing to Babies

By Jill Suttie | January 19, 2016

Are we born to sing? New research suggests that music is critical to emotional and social development.

 

Altruism is Sexy

By Tom Jacobs | January 15, 2016

In a new study, a kind heart trumps good looks—but the combination of both is the most desirable of all.

 

When Kindness Helps Teens (and When It Doesn’t)

By Kira M. Newman | January 14, 2016

According to a new study, we can predict whether teens will get into trouble by how nice they are to strangers.

 

Don’t Let Stress Hurt Your Relationship

By Kira M. Newman | January 6, 2016

A new study finds that men can shut down in the face of a romantic partner’s stress. Is there another way?

 

The Top 10 Insights from the “Science of a Meaningful Life” in 2015

By Jason Marsh, Kirra Dickinson, Kira M. Newman, Jill Suttie, Jeremy Adam Smith | December 29, 2015

The most surprising, provocative, and inspiring findings published this past year.

 

Mindfulness Is Good for Your Heart—and Your Waistline

By Adam Hoffman | December 23, 2015

Two new studies suggest that mindful people have a lower risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease.

 

Are the Rich Really Less Generous?

By Jason Marsh | December 22, 2015

A new study suggests that inequality—not wealth alone—reduces generosity.

 

When Going Along with the Crowd May be Good for Teens

By Jill Suttie | December 3, 2015

A new study finds that focusing on the group as a teen predicts better health as an adult.

 

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