In Brief

Most Recent Story

How Gratitude Helps Couples Through Hardship

By Adam Hoffman | November 17, 2015

A new study suggests that "thank you" can protect marriages from the toxic effects of conflict.


Past Stories

What Does a Grateful Brain Look Like?

By Adam Hoffman | November 16, 2015

"Thank you" doesn't just bring light to people's faces. It also lights up different parts of the brain.


How Friends Help Us Grow Old

By Jill Suttie | November 13, 2015

A new study suggests that we need a lot of social contact when we’re younger—but as we age, we need to focus on closeness.


Attention is the Secret to Virtue

By Art Markman | November 6, 2015

You don't necessarily need to convince people to change their behavior. You might just need to get them to pay attention to what they're doing.


Can Mindful Employees Make Happier Customers?

By Kira M. Newman | November 2, 2015

A recent study finds that client satisfaction goes up when employees cultivate moment-to-moment awareness.


Why Americans Struggle to be Happy

By Jill Suttie | October 26, 2015

A new cross-cultural study finds that we should pursue stronger social ties, not happiness.


Are Americans Really More Narcissistic?

By Nathan Collins | October 23, 2015

A new study suggests that Americans "are moderately narcissistic people living in a highly narcissistic culture."


How Mindfulness Improves Sleep

By Adam Hoffman | October 19, 2015

Work can be stressful. A new study suggests that even short meditation training can reduce stress and improve sleep quality.


Does Forgiveness Make Men Feel Weak?

By Kira M. Newman | October 14, 2015

A new study suggests that men and women might experience forgiveness differently.


Evidence Mounts That Mindfulness Breeds Resilience

By Tom Jacobs | October 12, 2015

Researchers argue that's a major reason why the practice is so beneficial.

Can Don Draper from the TV series Mad Men increase your emotional intelligence?

Watching TV Can Boost Emotional Intelligence

By Tom Jacobs | October 2, 2015

A new study finds that watching high-quality television dramas can increase our ability to read other people's emotions.


How Parents Influence Early Moral Development

By Jill Suttie | September 29, 2015

A new study finds that the key to raising moral kids lies with the parents' sense of empathy and injustice.


How Inequality Can Make Wealthy People Less Cooperative

By Jill Suttie | September 23, 2015

A new study finds that visible inequality makes wealthy people less likely to cooperate with others——which might lead to even greater disparities.


How Good Cheer Spreads Through Teen Social Networks

By Tom Jacobs | September 14, 2015

A new study finds that surrounding yourself with emotionally healthy friends is an effective way to avoid—or recover from—depression.


Can Mindfulness Reduce Binge Drinking at Colleges?

By Kira M. Newman | September 10, 2015

Binge-drinking students have lower grades, worse health, and more legal problems. A new study suggests a strategy that might help.


How to Be More Patient (and Why It’s Worth It)

By Art Markman | August 28, 2015

Research reveals why waiting just a little longer can lead to real benefits.


How Kindness Can Define Who You Are

By Nathan Collins | August 24, 2015

Research on neurodegenerative diseases suggests that identity Is lost without a moral compass.


How Loved Children Become Giving Adults

By Josh Elmore | August 20, 2015

A new study applies attachment theory to understand why some people donate more to charity than others.


How Anxiety Reduces Empathy

By Kira M. Newman | August 10, 2015

A study suggests that stress and surprise can hurt your ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes.


Learning Might Buffer Brain Against Addiction

By Yasmin Anwar | August 7, 2015

A new study challenges the idea that addiction might be hardwired in our brains.

Paul Piff

How Awe Makes Us Generous

By Adam Hoffman | August 3, 2015

A new study finds that feeling small in nature makes us more generous to other humans.


How Groups Shape Individual Judgment

By Art Markman | July 31, 2015

How social are people? New research suggests that we can go so far as to confuse our own actions with those of others.


Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.


The Sleepless See Threats Everywhere

By Yasmin Anwar | July 22, 2015

A new study finds that the sleep-deprived brain can mistake friends for foes.


What Drives Selfless Acts?

By Nathan Collins | July 20, 2015

Altruism has stumped researchers for years, but a new study finds that it may be as simple as choosing to be generous.


Why Are Some Children More Giving Than Others?

By Sarah Wheeler | June 29, 2015

A new study finds the answer may lie with family income.


Will Mindfulness Hurt Your Career?

By Kerri Cummings | June 15, 2015

Worried that mindfulness will undermine your drive to succeed? Research says you shouldn't be.


Why Cynicism Can Hold You Back

By Kira M. Newman | June 11, 2015

A new study suggests that distrusting human nature can actually hurt your income. The reason why might surprise you!

Michael Jordan shooting a free throw with his eyes closed.

The Zen of Basketball

By Tovin Lapan | June 1, 2015

With the NBA Finals about to get underway, the Warriors and the Cavaliers want any advantage they can get. Research suggests they should try mindfulness.


Is a Good Role Model a Positive One?

By Art Markman | May 20, 2015

A new study finds that positive role models aren't necessarily better than negative ones. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.


Helping Kids Overcome the Bystander Effect

By Kira M. Newman | May 18, 2015

A new study of five year olds reveals what forces stop us from helping people in need—and what we can do to overcome them.


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