In Brief

Most Recent Story

What Words Do You Associate with Happiness?

By Kira M. Newman | February 27, 2017

The answer matters for your mental health.

 
  

Past Stories


When Teachers Get Mindfulness Training, Students Win

By Jill Suttie | February 23, 2017

According to a new study, training teachers in mindfulness can affect the whole climate of the classroom.

 

Can You Change Your Personality?

By Jill Suttie | February 20, 2017

A new review of many studies suggests that our personality isn't as unchangeable as we think.

 

Does Your View of Happiness Shape Your Empathy?

By Jeanette van der Lee | February 16, 2017


Do you see happiness as within your control to improve? A new study has linked this belief to empathy.

 
A demonstrator throws stones at riot police during an anti-government protest in eastern Caracas, Venezuela, on February 27th, 2014.

Suffering May Lead to Extreme Political Beliefs

By Tom Jacobs | February 9, 2017

According to a new study, experiencing adversity may contribute to politically polarized attitudes.

 

Can Meditating Together Improve Your Relationships?

By Jill Suttie | February 6, 2017

New research suggests that there are some unique social benefits to partner meditation.

 

How to Nurture Empathic Joy in Your Classroom

By Amy L. Eva | February 2, 2017

According to a new study, students perform better when teachers share in their joy.

 

How Adults Communicate Bias to Children

By Jill Suttie | January 31, 2017

A new study suggests preschoolers can "catch" prejudice from grown-ups through nonverbal behavior—and it hints at solutions.

 

Does Your Personality Predict Your Happiness?

By Kira M. Newman | January 25, 2017

According to a new study, the relationship between happiness and personality is more complex than we thought.

 
Rhode Island, empathy capital of the United States

The Most (and Least) Empathic States of America

By Tom Jacobs | January 18, 2017

New research finds levels of empathy vary considerably from state to state — and living among empathic neighbors improves quality of life.

 

Can Compassion Training Help Physicians Avoid Burnout?

By Jill Suttie | January 12, 2017

A new study suggests that compassion training may buffer against the detrimental effects of high-stress medical training, particularly for those prone to depression.

 

How to Find Happiness When You Reflect on the Past Year

By Kira M. Newman | December 29, 2016

According to a new study, reminiscing about certain types of experiences could boost your well-being.

 

Why Sex Gets Better in Old Age

By Miri Forbes, Robert Krueger, Nicholas Eaton | December 22, 2016

According to a new study, our sexual priorities change as we age and that keeps our sex lives satisfying.

 

Is the Drive to Be Masculine Hurting Your Mental Health?

By Jeremy Adam Smith | December 21, 2016

A wave of studies in 2016 suggest that masculine ideals can hurt men's physical and mental health. But they also hint at a healthier aspiration for men.

 

Should We Always Look for Silver Linings?

By Kira M. Newman | December 13, 2016

According to a new study, changing your perspective may be helpful in some situations—but not others.

 

Does Self-Compassion Make You Selfish?

By Jill Suttie | December 5, 2016

A new study suggests that self-compassion makes you hold yourself to a higher standard of morality.

 
Famous androids: Maeve and Dolores Abernathy from Westworld, and Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Human or Fake? You’ll Know in One Second

By Yasmin Anwar | December 1, 2016

We can be fooled by androids like Maeve in the TV show Westworld, but not so much in real life, a new study suggests.

 

Can Corporate Giving Make You More Generous?

By Elizabeth Hopper | November 28, 2016

According to a new study, generous businesses inspire individuals to give, too—thanks to one particular emotion.

 

Teens Overestimate the Bad Behavior of Peers

By Sarah W. Helms | November 25, 2016

All the cool kids aren’t doing it, says a new study. In fact, teens underestimate good behavior among their classmates.

 
Study participants work together on an activity.

How the Growth Mindset Can Increase Cooperation

By Alex Shashkevich | November 16, 2016

In a new study, researchers saw Jewish- and Palestinian-Israeli students cooperating better after a simple lesson.

 

Narcissists Finish Last

By Adam Hoffman | November 15, 2016

According to a new study, narcissists start out popular—but eventually, people see through them.

 

What Does the Way Your Mind Wanders Reveal about You?

By Yasmin Anwar | November 7, 2016

According to a new study, conditions like ADHD and anxiety may be linked to normal brain functions gone awry.

 

Can Mindfulness Help You Be More Authentic?

By Kira M. Newman | October 31, 2016

According to a new study, mindful people might be happier because they act according to their values.

 

People Who Feel Excluded Are Susceptible to Conspiracy Theories

By Tom Jacobs | October 27, 2016

New research provides a possible clue as to why so many Donald Trump supporters believe outlandish things.

 

When Women Are More Likely to Lie

By Pamela Tom | October 24, 2016

A new study reveals how gender and social pressure drive unethical decisions.

 

People Who Trust Technology Are Happier

By Deborah Yip | October 20, 2016

Whether you're religious or not, putting your faith in science and technology could be good for you, a new study suggests.

 

Changing Diapers as Foreplay

By Erica Reischer | October 18, 2016

Research on couples shows a surprising way to improve intimacy after having kids.

 

How to Choose a Type of Mindfulness Meditation

By Kira M. Newman | October 11, 2016

A new study teases out the different benefits of four kinds of meditation.

 

How to Find Prejudice Hidden in Our Words

By Jenn Director Knudsen | October 5, 2016

The language we choose reflects our implicit biases—but according to a new study, mindfulness can help.

 

Why Do Some People Love Sad Music?

By Tuomas Eerola | September 29, 2016

According to a new study, empathy plays a role in how we respond to depressing tunes.

 

Can Mindfulness Help Parents and Preteens Have Better Relationships?

By Summer Allen | September 27, 2016

A new study combines training, brain scans, and reports from kids to understand the impact of mindfulness on parenting tweens.

 

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