In Brief

Most Recent Story

Can Don Draper from the TV series Mad Men increase your emotional intelligence?

Watching TV Can Boost Emotional Intelligence

By Tom Jacobs | October 2, 2015

A new study finds that watching high-quality television dramas can increase our ability to read other people's emotions.


Past Stories

How Parents Influence Early Moral Development

By Jill Suttie | September 29, 2015

A new study finds that the key to raising moral kids lies with the parents' sense of empathy and injustice.


How Inequality Can Make Wealthy People Less Cooperative

By Jill Suttie | September 23, 2015

A new study finds that visible inequality makes wealthy people less likely to cooperate with others——which might lead to even greater disparities.


How Good Cheer Spreads Through Teen Social Networks

By Tom Jacobs | September 14, 2015

A new study finds that surrounding yourself with emotionally healthy friends is an effective way to avoid—or recover from—depression.


Can Mindfulness Reduce Binge Drinking at Colleges?

By Kira M. Newman | September 10, 2015

Binge-drinking students have lower grades, worse health, and more legal problems. A new study suggests a strategy that might help.


How to Be More Patient (and Why It’s Worth It)

By Art Markman | August 28, 2015

Research reveals why waiting just a little longer can lead to real benefits.


How Kindness Can Define Who You Are

By Nathan Collins | August 24, 2015

Research on neurodegenerative diseases suggests that identity Is lost without a moral compass.


How Loved Children Become Giving Adults

By Josh Elmore | August 20, 2015

A new study applies attachment theory to understand why some people donate more to charity than others.


How Anxiety Reduces Empathy

By Kira M. Newman | August 10, 2015

A study suggests that stress and surprise can hurt your ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes.


Learning Might Buffer Brain Against Addiction

By Yasmin Anwar | August 7, 2015

A new study challenges the idea that addiction might be hardwired in our brains.

Paul Piff

How Awe Makes Us Generous

By Adam Hoffman | August 3, 2015

A new study finds that feeling small in nature makes us more generous to other humans.


How Groups Shape Individual Judgment

By Art Markman | July 31, 2015

How social are people? New research suggests that we can go so far as to confuse our own actions with those of others.


Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.


The Sleepless See Threats Everywhere

By Yasmin Anwar | July 22, 2015

A new study finds that the sleep-deprived brain can mistake friends for foes.


What Drives Selfless Acts?

By Nathan Collins | July 20, 2015

Altruism has stumped researchers for years, but a new study finds that it may be as simple as choosing to be generous.


Why Are Some Children More Giving Than Others?

By Sarah Wheeler | June 29, 2015

A new study finds the answer may lie with family income.


Will Mindfulness Hurt Your Career?

By Kerri Cummings | June 15, 2015

Worried that mindfulness will undermine your drive to succeed? Research says you shouldn't be.


Why Cynicism Can Hold You Back

By Kira M. Newman | June 11, 2015

A new study suggests that distrusting human nature can actually hurt your income. The reason why might surprise you!

Michael Jordan shooting a free throw with his eyes closed.

The Zen of Basketball

By Tovin Lapan | June 1, 2015

With the NBA Finals about to get underway, the Warriors and the Cavaliers want any advantage they can get. Research suggests they should try mindfulness.


Is a Good Role Model a Positive One?

By Art Markman | May 20, 2015

A new study finds that positive role models aren't necessarily better than negative ones. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.


Helping Kids Overcome the Bystander Effect

By Kira M. Newman | May 18, 2015

A new study of five year olds reveals what forces stop us from helping people in need—and what we can do to overcome them.


How Our Bodies React to Seeing Goodness

By Jill Suttie | May 12, 2015

A new study maps what happens in our bodies and brains when we witness acts of kindness and compassion.


Is Facebook Building Political Bridges?

By Tom Jacobs | May 8, 2015

Two new studies defy conventional wisdom by finding that social media is exposing people to different ideas, not isolating them.


Why People Make Sacrifices for Others

By Josh Elmore | April 29, 2015

A new study asks: Is costly altruism motivated more by self-centered distress or a compassionate desire to relieve another person’s pain?


What Makes Us Thankful?

By Art Markman | April 20, 2015

A recent study suggests that a belief in the free will of other people is key to our ability to feel gratitude when they do something to help us out.


How to Help a Narcissist to Forgive

By Linda Graham | April 14, 2015

Narcissists struggle to forgive people for even minor transgressions. But a new study points the way forward.


Why Some People Own Mistakes and Others Don’t

By Art Markman | April 13, 2015

What helps us to take responsibility for our mistakes? A recent study says the key might lie with your belief that people can change.


Why You Should Love Thy Coworker

By Kira M. Newman | April 6, 2015

A new study suggests that fostering compassion among health care workers might improve the quality of patient care.


Can a Pill Make You More Compassionate?

By Tom Levy | March 25, 2015

A new study suggests that altering the chemical balance in our brains can make us more committed to fairness.


You Need More Than a Book to Learn Loving-Kindness

By Kira M. Newman | March 23, 2015

A new study suggests that experience trumps intellectual knowledge when it comes to fostering compassion.

Can you spot true happiness in a person's smile? Take our emotional intelligence quiz!

Are Conservatives Really Happier than Liberals?

By Tom Jacobs | March 16, 2015

Research has found that right-wingers report being happier than those on the left. But a new study calls that into question by measuring words and behavior.


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Self-Compassion By Kristin Neff Learn to be kind to yourself. A society obsessed with competition doesn't always make that an easy thing to do, but seeking after self-compassion, not self-esteem, is our ticket to happiness.

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Best-selling author and founder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program

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