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The Trouble with Mindfulness Apps

By Stephany Tlalka | August 24, 2016

When your favorite mindfulness app says it’s based in science, check twice. Few actually are.

 
  

Past Stories

Four Reasons to Practice Mindfulness During Pregnancy

By Kira M. Newman | August 17, 2016

New research is starting to suggest that mindfulness practice can protect the health and well-being of mothers and their babies.

 

Why It Doesn’t Pay to be a People-Pleaser

By Christine Carter | August 9, 2016

Christine Carter always tried to meet other people’s expectations—until she realized how out of sync with her own wants and needs she’d become.

 

Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

By Scott Barry Kaufman | August 4, 2016

A new study tries to measure the impact of reading on creativity and the motivation to write.

 

How to Stop the Racist in You

By Jeremy Adam Smith, Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton | July 27, 2016

The new science of bias suggests that we all carry prejudices within ourselves—and we all have the tools to keep them in check.

 

Why Can’t We Remember Our Early Childhood?

By Jeanne Shinskey | July 26, 2016

Research into "childhood amnesia" sheds light on how memories are formed and maintained.

 

How to Save Your Marriage from Parenthood

By Amie M. Gordon | July 20, 2016

Amie Gordon offers five tips to maintain (or reignite) the spark in your relationship.

 

How Mindfulness Can Help Couples Cool Down

By Linda Graham | July 5, 2016

Linda Graham explains how therapists—and couples themselves—can prevent conflicts from spiraling out of control.

 

Why We Should Teach Empathy to Preschoolers

By Shuka Kalantari | June 29, 2016

One Berkeley preschool is baking empathy into its curriculum—and for good reason.

 

How Music Bonds Us Together

By Jill Suttie | June 28, 2016

According to new research, music helps synchronize our bodies and our brains.

 

Do We Need More Empathic Judges?

By Jill Suttie | June 22, 2016

A light rape sentence sparks outrage—and raises questions about the place of empathy and bias in judicial decision-making.

 

What Are Your Happiness Strengths and Weaknesses?

By Tchiki Davis | June 16, 2016

To get happier, you need to develop a personalized, strategic plan.

 

How Nature Helps Fathers Nurture

By Jeremy Adam Smith, Summer Allen | June 15, 2016

What biological forces could help explain why some fathers are more involved with children than others?

 

Five Ways Parents Can Help Prevent Teen Depression

By Jill Suttie | June 14, 2016

New research is revealing how to protect teens' mental health during a challenging part of life.

 

The Science of the Story

By Jeremy Adam Smith | June 8, 2016

We know in our gut when we’re hearing a good story—and research is starting to explain why.

 

How to Cultivate Ethical Courage

By Brooke Deterline | June 2, 2016

In the face of internal and external pressure, these three tips can help you stand up for your values.

 
Swiss proponents of basic income dump 8 million coins in a public square, one for each Swiss resident.

Would Basic Income Make Us Happier?

By Kira M. Newman | May 31, 2016

How would a guaranteed minimum income affect our happiness, motivation, and sense of meaning in life?

 

How Teachers Can Help Students Who Fail in Class to Succeed at Life

By Mark Katz | May 24, 2016

There are people who got bad grades but grew up to be successful adults, says Mark Katz. What’s their secret—and how can schools help?

 

Five Tips for Teaching Mindfulness to At-Risk Teens

By Karen Bluth | May 23, 2016

Karen Bluth shares the highs, lows, and lessons from teaching mindfulness at a low-income high school.

 

How Mindfulness Is Changing Law Enforcement

By Jill Suttie | May 18, 2016

Meditation is helping police officers to de-escalate volatile situations, improve community relations—and improve their own well-being.

 
Adapted from Dacher Keltner's new book, The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence (Penguin Press, May 17, 2016)

How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It

By Dacher Keltner | May 17, 2016

In an adaptation from his new book, Dacher Keltner explains the secret to gaining and keeping power: focus on the good of others.

 

How Awe Sharpens Our Brains

By Michelle Lani Shiota | May 11, 2016

According to emerging research, we're better thinkers when we're feeling awe.

 
Explore awe in depth at The Art & Science of Awe, an inspiring day-long event on June 4 at UC Berkeley or via webcast.

Why Do We Feel Awe?

By Dacher Keltner | May 10, 2016

According to Dacher Keltner, there are important evolutionary reasons: It's good for our minds, bodies, and social connections.

 

Ten Changes New Parents Face

By Diana Divecha | May 4, 2016

Diana Divecha describes how your mind, body, and life will change with the arrival of a baby.

 

Feeling Entitled to a Little Gratitude This Mother’s Day?

By Christine Carter | May 3, 2016

Christine Carter gets to the heart of the resentment she feels on Mother's Day.

 

Three Ways to Make a Teacher Feel Appreciated

By Jeremy Adam Smith | May 2, 2016

Teacher Appreciation Week is here, not a moment too soon. How can parents and students help teachers to see their own strengths?

 

How to Build an Inclusive School Community During a Divisive Election

By Vicki Zakrzewski | April 28, 2016

A new report finds that the presidential election is having a negative impact on students. What can educators do?

 

How Positive Media Can Make Us Better People

By Sophie H. Janicke | April 27, 2016

Research sometimes suggests that movies and other media are a negative influence to rein in. But new studies highlight their potential to spread goodness on a wide scale.

 

Four Risk Factors for Burnout—And How to Overcome Them

By Tchiki Davis | April 21, 2016

A burnout survivor offers tips for coping with it—or avoiding it in the first place.

 

The Right Way to Get Angry at Work

By Deanna Geddes, Dirk Lindebaum | April 19, 2016

Anger has a place at work, Deanna Geddes and Dirk Lindebaum argue, as long as it meets three conditions. 


 

Can Helping Others Keep You Sober?

By Jill Suttie | April 14, 2016

New research suggests that helping others—and the sense of belonging it brings—can help alcohol and drug addicts stay sober.

 

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