In Brief

Most Recent Story

Can Compassion Training Help Physicians Avoid Burnout?

By Jill Suttie | January 12, 2017

A new study suggests that compassion training may buffer against the detrimental effects of high-stress medical training, particularly for those prone to depression.

 
  

Past Stories

How to Find Happiness When You Reflect on the Past Year

By Kira M. Newman | December 29, 2016

According to a new study, reminiscing about certain types of experiences could boost your well-being.

 

Why Sex Gets Better in Old Age

By Miri Forbes, Robert Krueger, Nicholas Eaton | December 22, 2016

According to a new study, our sexual priorities change as we age and that keeps our sex lives satisfying.

 

Is the Drive to Be Masculine Hurting Your Mental Health?

By Jeremy Adam Smith | December 21, 2016

A wave of studies in 2016 suggest that masculine ideals can hurt men's physical and mental health. But they also hint at a healthier aspiration for men.

 

Should We Always Look for Silver Linings?

By Kira M. Newman | December 13, 2016

According to a new study, changing your perspective may be helpful in some situations—but not others.

 

Does Self-Compassion Make You Selfish?

By Jill Suttie | December 5, 2016

A new study suggests that self-compassion makes you hold yourself to a higher standard of morality.

 
Famous androids: Maeve and Dolores Abernathy from Westworld, and Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Human or Fake? You’ll Know in One Second

By Yasmin Anwar | December 1, 2016

We can be fooled by androids like Maeve in the TV show Westworld, but not so much in real life, a new study suggests.

 

Can Corporate Giving Make You More Generous?

By Elizabeth Hopper | November 28, 2016

According to a new study, generous businesses inspire individuals to give, too—thanks to one particular emotion.

 

Teens Overestimate the Bad Behavior of Peers

By Sarah W. Helms | November 25, 2016

All the cool kids aren’t doing it, says a new study. In fact, teens underestimate good behavior among their classmates.

 
Study participants work together on an activity.

How the Growth Mindset Can Increase Cooperation

By Alex Shashkevich | November 16, 2016

In a new study, researchers saw Jewish- and Palestinian-Israeli students cooperating better after a simple lesson.

 

Narcissists Finish Last

By Adam Hoffman | November 15, 2016

According to a new study, narcissists start out popular—but eventually, people see through them.

 

What Does the Way Your Mind Wanders Reveal about You?

By Yasmin Anwar | November 7, 2016

According to a new study, conditions like ADHD and anxiety may be linked to normal brain functions gone awry.

 

Can Mindfulness Help You Be More Authentic?

By Kira M. Newman | October 31, 2016

According to a new study, mindful people might be happier because they act according to their values.

 

People Who Feel Excluded Are Susceptible to Conspiracy Theories

By Tom Jacobs | October 27, 2016

New research provides a possible clue as to why so many Donald Trump supporters believe outlandish things.

 

When Women Are More Likely to Lie

By Pamela Tom | October 24, 2016

A new study reveals how gender and social pressure drive unethical decisions.

 

People Who Trust Technology Are Happier

By Deborah Yip | October 20, 2016

Whether you're religious or not, putting your faith in science and technology could be good for you, a new study suggests.

 

Changing Diapers as Foreplay

By Erica Reischer | October 18, 2016

Research on couples shows a surprising way to improve intimacy after having kids.

 

How to Choose a Type of Mindfulness Meditation

By Kira M. Newman | October 11, 2016

A new study teases out the different benefits of four kinds of meditation.

 

How to Find Prejudice Hidden in Our Words

By Jenn Director Knudsen | October 5, 2016

The language we choose reflects our implicit biases—but according to a new study, mindfulness can help.

 

Why Do Some People Love Sad Music?

By Tuomas Eerola | September 29, 2016

According to a new study, empathy plays a role in how we respond to depressing tunes.

 

Can Mindfulness Help Parents and Preteens Have Better Relationships?

By Summer Allen | September 27, 2016

A new study combines training, brain scans, and reports from kids to understand the impact of mindfulness on parenting tweens.

 

When Should You Forgive Your Partner?

By Amie M. Gordon | September 26, 2016


According to a new study, forgiving your partner may backfire if they have a certain personality type.

 

How Background Music Influences Our Behavior at Work

By Jill Suttie | September 22, 2016

A new study suggests that happy, rhythmic music increases cooperative behavior—and that may be good news for employers.

 

For Managers, Saying Sorry Isn’t Enough

By Kira M. Newman | September 20, 2016

According to a new study, we’re less likely to forgive leaders and managers—even when they apologize.

 

Could Gay-Straight Alliances Reduce Bullying?

By Robert Marx, Heather Hensman Kettrey | September 16, 2016

Thousands of these organizations exist. Could they make a difference?

 

Altruists Have More Sex

By Tom Jacobs | September 12, 2016

According to a new study, people who give more get more (if you know what we mean).

 

White Racism May Hurt the Health of Both Whites and Blacks

By Yasmin Anwar | September 8, 2016

According to a new study, there are more heart-disease-related deaths in overtly racist communities.

 

Can Mindfulness Stop Internet Addiction in Teens?

By Kira M. Newman | August 29, 2016

Could cultivating attention and awareness help teens to stop checking their phones?

 

The Power of Forgiveness at Work

By Brooke Deterline | August 26, 2016

Ever carry a grudge or harbor revenge fantasies about a colleague or boss? It’s likely costing you and your workplace.

 

Can a Change in Mindset Help Teens De-stress?

By Sarah Wheeler | August 23, 2016

According to a recent study, training teens in a "growth mindset" can reduce their stress and improve their grades.

 

How Grudges Hurt Your Health

By Joanna McParland | August 19, 2016

According to a new study, people are more sensitive to pain when they feel a sense of injustice.

 

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