Tag: Cooperation


Tag: Cooperation

These are the most recent things on the site for the tag: Cooperation. You can view more tags here.

Articles: Want to Be Happy? Make Your Relationships Exceptional

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas | November 9, 2015

New data from our Science of Happiness course confirm the link between well-being and relationship quality.


Articles: How Inequality Can Make Wealthy People Less Cooperative

By Jill Suttie | September 23, 2015

A new study finds that visible inequality makes wealthy people less likely to cooperate with others——which might lead to even greater disparities.


Articles: Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.


Articles: You Should Always Shake Hands with a Robot

By Chris Bevan, Danaë Stanton Fraser | May 29, 2015

Touch between humans can build trust and cooperation. But how do we feel when we touch machines?

Adapted from The Upside of Stress (Avery, 2015).

Articles: How to Transform Stress into Courage and Connection

By Kelly McGonigal | May 13, 2015

Stress doesn't always lead to fight-or-flight, says Kelly McGonigal. It can also activate brain systems that help us connect with other people.

Picador, 2015, 240 pages

Articles: The Place of Care in the Economy

By Jill Suttie | May 4, 2015

A new book brings economists, scientists, and Buddhists together to explore the spiritual dimensions of the economy.

Which one will you choose?

Articles: How Science Helps Us Find the Good

By Jeremy Adam Smith | April 9, 2015

Looking back at 10 years of writing about the science of human goodness for Greater Good, Jeremy Adam Smith discovers that the bad and good—and the inner and outer—go hand in hand.

They look like they're fighting—but in fact these two bonobos are playing.

Articles: What Can Bonobos Tell Us about Ourselves?

By Frans de Waal | March 3, 2015

Famed primatologist Frans de Waal takes on the unproven assumption that apes and humans are natural-born killers.


Articles: Four Ways Music Strengthens Social Bonds

By Jill Suttie | January 15, 2015

Why would human evolution have given us music? New research says the answer may lie in our drive to connect.

Joshua Wolf Shenk

Articles: The Social Artist

By Jill Suttie | September 23, 2014

A new book argues that creativity can be—and often is—a social endeavor, rather than the work of a lone genius.

Rodrigo Guzman and his parents in Mexico

Articles: How to Foster Empathy for Immigrants

By Jeremy Adam Smith | August 6, 2014

Why did a group of fourth graders rally in support of an undocumented classmate while the citizens of Murrieta, California, tried to stop immigrant children from entering their town?

Hudson Street Press, 266 pages, 2014

Articles: What’s the Truth about Trust?

By Jill Suttie | May 21, 2014

A new book says that trustworthiness is a moving target, dependent on our moods, circumstances, and competing needs.

A child buys tickets at the Halloween-Día de los Muertos fundraiser for Junipero Serra Elementary in San Francisco.

Articles: Five Ways to Encourage Giving to Disadvantaged Public Schools

By Jeremy Adam Smith | February 6, 2014

Parent donations can widen inequities between public schools. What can we do to motivate affluent parents to charitably support all schools, not just their own?

To learn more, read this Q&A with Daniel Goleman about Focus in Greater Good!

Articles: Our Favorite Books of 2013

By Jill Suttie, Jeremy Adam Smith, Jason Marsh | December 16, 2013

Greater Good's editors pick the most thought-provoking, important, or useful nonfiction books published this year on the science of a meaningful life.

Joshua Greene's new book, Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them (Penguin Press, 432 pages, 2013)

Articles: How to Close the Gap Between Us and Them

By Jill Suttie | November 7, 2013

A Q&A with Moral Tribes author Joshua Greene about emotion, reason, and conflict.


Articles: The Cooperative Instinct

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas | September 21, 2012

A new study finds that our first, quickest impulse is to cooperate, not compete.


Research Digest Items/Studies: Tough Guys Sacrifice More


Research Digest Items/Studies: Why We Help Strangers


Research Digest Items/Studies: Are Two Heads Really Better Than One?

Little, Brown and Company, 2011, 432 pages

Articles: Urban Evolution

By Jill Suttie | November 4, 2011

A review of David Sloan Wilson's The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve My City, One Block at a Time.


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