The Science of Happiness. Register Today
   

Raising Happiness

 

February Newsletter: Why Focus On Romance?

February 23, 2011 | Newsletters | 0 comments

Hello Raising Happiness readers!

During this month of love, I started to dig into the research related to happy relationships.  Were you baffled by all the posts on the science of a good marriage?  What does a happy romantic relationship have to do with raising happy kids, after all?

We know intuitively that how happy we are—in a relationship or otherwise—affects our children.  Our emotions are contagious, and so when a romantic partner loves us unconditionally, the happiness and security that love brings can spill over, to our children’s benefit.  Romance also has the potential to make us better parents: positive emotions (like love) and the social support of a partner can make us warmer and more responsive to our children.

An interesting study presented at the last annual meeting of the American Psychological Association by Robert Epstein and Shannon Fox shows this to be true in a different way.

The researchers compared the effectiveness of 10 important parenting practices and skills; for example, they examined how well parents reported supporting their children’s education, and to what extent they provide educational opportunities for them.  Here are the top three most important “parenting competencies,” as reported by Epstein in Scientific American Mind, in terms of their influence on kids’ health, happiness, and school success, as well as the quality of the parent’s relationship with their children:

1.Love and affection.  You support and accept the child, are physically affectionate, and spend quality one-on-one time together.

2.Stress management. You take steps to reduce stress for yourself and your child, practice relaxation techniques and promote positive interpretations of events.

3.Relationship skills.  You maintain a healthy relationship with your spouse, significant other and/or co-parent and model effective relationship skills with other people.


Here is what I think is amazing about that list: two of those three most important practices aren’t even parenting skills, per se, in that they don’t directly affect our children.  Or do they?

We all know that when we are stressed out, our stress spills over, and often makes our children anxious. So stress management skills turn out to be really important for our relationship with our children, and also our children’s happiness and school success!

So too with our relationship with our children’s other parent, whether or not we are romantically involved, as well as our relationship with a romantic partner (if it isn’t the other parent). It’s true: little is more important than maintaining and improving the relationships we have with our partners and co-parents.  Like most parents, I try to model positive relationship skills for my for my children; all this great new science related to what happy couples do is helpful in knowing how to grow the love in my life.

Epstein and Fox’s study found another thing to be true: that parenting education can improve our parenting, and therefore our children’s outcomes.  Epstein writes: “Our data confirm that parents who have taken parenting classes produce better outcomes with their children than parents who lack such training and that more training leads to better outcomes.”  To that end, I have three classes to offer you:

If you have one day, come to a training that I’m giving with Fred Luskin through the Greater Good Science Center’s Science of a Meaningful Life seminar series. This seminar focuses on the science related to great romantic relationships.  This class can be taken for CEUs online or at UC Berkeley.  For more information or to register, click here.

If you have a weekend, come enjoy a workshop at the beautiful Esalon Institute.  This will be a weekend version of my Raising Happiness Parenting Class, described below.  You can even bring your children—a corresponding kids’ program will be taking place.  For more information or to register, click here.

Finally, if you have 20-30 minutes a week, sign up for my online Raising Happiness Class.  The class covers nine themes and is paced for busy parents. Take the class in the comfort of your own home at your leisure; scholarships are available.  For more information or to register, click here.

As always, thank you for all of your comments, your enthusiasm, and support!

© 2011 Christine Carter, Ph.D.

Become a fan of Raising Happiness on Facebook.
Follow Christine Carter on Twitter
Sign up for the Raising Happiness CLASS!

 

Tracker Pixel for Entry
 
 
 
Tags

 
  

Like this post?

Here's what you can do:

Donate
 
  
 
  

Buy the Book!

Learn more about the science of raising happy kids in Christine Carter's popular book.

BUY
 
  
 
 

Subscribe to this Blog

Every time a new Raising Happiness post is published, get it as an email or via RSS feed.

Subscribe

 

Most...

  
  
Is she flirting with you? Take the quiz and find out.
image

Greater Good Articles

  
  

Twitter

 

Greater Good Live

  

The Evolutionary Roots of Compassion

The Evolutionary Roots of Compassion

Dacher Keltner explains why Darwin thought compassion is humans’ strongest instinct.

Watch
 

The Greater Good Guide to Mindfulness

The Greater Good Guide to Mindfulness

This invaluable resource, a special benefit for GGSC members, offers insight into what mindfulness is, why it’s important, and how to teach it.

Get the Guide
 

Joshua Wolf Shenk on Creativity and the Powers of Two

Hillside Club
September 25, 2014
Joshua Wolf Shenk on Creativity and the Powers of Two

Author Joshua Shenk in Conversation on creativity and dynamic duos with cofounder of Mother Jones, Adam Hochschild

» All Events

 
  

Sponsors

The Quality of Life Foundation logo Special thanks to

The Quality of Life Foundation for its support of the Greater Good Science Center

 
thnx advertisement