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Compassionate Organizations Quiz

Does your organization foster compassion or callousness?

Compassionate Organizations Quiz While we often think about compassion as an individual quality, the organizations where we spend our time—such as workplaces, schools, places of worship, and community centers—can actually impact whether and how we respond to someone in distress.

This quiz measures the level of compassion in an organization. It is based on more than 10 years of research on compassion and organizations by the research collaborative CompassionLab and the Center for Positive Organizational Scholarship at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business. CompassionLab has partnered with the Greater Good Science Center to develop this quiz especially for our website.

To take the quiz, think of one organization to which you belong, and keep that organization in mind as you answer the questions. The first 16 items assess how you and others feel, think, and act when you’re in that organization. There are no right or wrong answers, so please respond as honestly as possible. The final 7 questions will help our research team see how people’s experiences of compassion in organizations relate to factors like gender, age, and the size of the organization.

When you're done, you'll get your organization’s compassion score, along with ideas for cultivating compassion in the organization. We'll report next month on what the scores suggest about the Greater Good community.

1. When I see that someone in my organization is hurting in some way, I feel comfortable offering assistance or help.

When I see that someone in my organization is hurting in some way, I feel comfortable offering assistance or help.

2. In my organization, people are expected to leave their emotions at the door and not share their troubles.

In my organization, people are expected to leave their emotions at the door and not share their troubles.

3. When someone is in need, my organization uses its communication channels, such as an internal newsletter or email update, to notify members of ways we can help and support that person.

When someone is in need, my organization uses its communication channels, such as an internal newsletter or email update, to notify members of ways we can help and support that person.

4. The leaders in my organization take time to talk and listen to people who are having a hard time.

The leaders in my organization take time to talk and listen to people who are having a hard time.

5. People in my organization feel comfortable revealing that they’re stressed out, suffering, feeling burdened, or experiencing hardships.

People in my organization feel comfortable revealing that they’re stressed out, suffering, feeling burdened, or experiencing hardships.

6. When I feel distressed, I have the sense that others at my organization feel concerned for me.

When I feel distressed, I have the sense that others at my organization feel concerned for me.

7. I hear stories in my organization about colleagues receiving support from one another during difficult times, such as through meals, cards, flowers, or other expressions of care.

I hear stories in my organization about colleagues receiving support from one another during difficult times, such as through meals, cards, flowers, or other expressions of care.

8. In my organization, everyone is too busy to pay attention to whether someone is suffering or not.

In my organization, everyone is too busy to pay attention to whether someone is suffering or not.

9. When my organization is looking for new members, we talk about care and compassion as part of what makes someone fit.

When my organization is looking for new members, we talk about care and compassion as part of what makes someone fit.

10. My organization sponsors ways for us to help others in need, such as donation programs, fundraisers, or financial support or vacation donation funds for colleagues.

My organization sponsors ways for us to help others in need, such as donation programs, fundraisers, or financial support or vacation donation funds for colleagues.

11. When someone at my organization talks about his or her troubles, it makes other people feel anxious and want to avoid that person.

When someone at my organization talks about his or her troubles, it makes other people feel anxious and want to avoid that person.

12. I feel that the leaders in my organization support efforts to respond to someone who needs help or care.

I feel that the leaders in my organization support efforts to respond to someone who needs help or care.

13. When I am in my organization, I feel valued as a whole person.

When I am in my organization, I feel valued as a whole person.

14. In my organization, it is seen as a sign of weakness to ask for help, flexibility, or accommodations if someone is facing painful circumstances.

In my organization, it is seen as a sign of weakness to ask for help, flexibility, or accommodations if someone is facing painful circumstances.

15. When someone in my organization expresses that they are having a hard time, most people believe they deserve a caring response.

When someone in my organization expresses that they are having a hard time, most people believe they deserve a caring response.

16. When people in my organization help someone in need, they consider that individual’s unique preferences and needs rather than responding in a more generic way.

When people in my organization help someone in need, they consider that individual’s unique preferences and needs rather than responding in a more generic way.

17. I have been a recipient of compassion in my organization.

I have been a recipient of compassion in my organization.

18. My organization is primarily a/an:

My organization is primarily a/an:

19. For how long have you been a member of this organization?

For how long have you been a member of this organization?

20. Approximately how many people belong to your organization?

Approximately how many people belong to your organization?

21. What is your gender?

What is your gender?

22. What is your age?

What is your age?

23. What is your geographic location (in the U.S., unless otherwise indicated)?

What is your geographic location (in the U.S., unless otherwise indicated)?

Source: CompassionLab. Click here to learn more about CompassionLab’s 10 years of research on compassion and organizations.

 

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