Tag: Evolution

 

Tag: Evolution

These are the most recent things on the site for the tag: Evolution. You can view more tags here.

Articles: Altruists Have More Sex

By Tom Jacobs | September 12, 2016

According to a new study, people who give more get more (if you know what we mean).

 

Articles: Why Do American Soldiers Miss War?

By Jenara Nerenberg | September 1, 2016

According to author Sebastian Junger, facing social isolation back at home deepens the trauma.

 

Articles: Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

By Scott Barry Kaufman | August 4, 2016

A new study tries to measure the impact of reading on creativity and the motivation to write.

 
Explore awe in depth at The Art & Science of Awe, an inspiring day-long event on June 4 at UC Berkeley or via webcast.

Articles: Why Do We Feel Awe?

By Dacher Keltner | May 10, 2016

According to Dacher Keltner, there are important evolutionary reasons: It's good for our minds, bodies, and social connections.

 

Articles: How Happy Brains Respond to Negative Things

By Summer Allen, Jeremy Adam Smith | March 17, 2016

New research provides a whole new understanding of the brain's amygdala—and suggests that happy people take the bad with the good.

 
2015, Oxford University Press, 312 pages

Articles: How Altruistic is Your Brain?

By Jill Suttie | March 4, 2016

A new book argues that neuroscience findings suggest that altruism is not a response to moral authority, but rather a hard-wired instinct.

 

Articles: How Songs Help Children Bond

By Tom Jacobs | January 22, 2016

A new study suggests music plays a role in our early tendency to distinguish friend from foe.

 

Articles: Altruism is Sexy

By Tom Jacobs | January 15, 2016

In a new study, a kind heart trumps good looks—but the combination of both is the most desirable of all.

 

Articles: How Fear Hurts Us

By Jeremy Adam Smith | December 30, 2015

In the wake of terrorist attacks, American politicians are stoking fear of Muslims. But there's another, better way to respond to violence, argues Jeremy Adam Smith

 

Articles: How Our Brains Make Us Generous

By Summer Allen, Jill Suttie | December 21, 2015

A recent series of ground-breaking neuroscience studies suggest that empathy and altruism are deeply rooted in human nature.

 

Articles: The New Science of Singing Together

By Jacques Launay, Eiluned Pearce | December 4, 2015

Studies find that singing in a choir helps forge social bonds—and it might even make you healthier.

 

Articles: When Going Along with the Crowd May be Good for Teens

By Jill Suttie | December 3, 2015

A new study finds that focusing on the group as a teen predicts better health as an adult.

 

Articles: Why Does Therapy Work?

By Jill Suttie | November 10, 2015

A new book argues that talk therapy helps heal psychological wounds by making use of hardwired human needs for connection, understanding, and belonging.

 
Matthieu Ricard

Articles: Can People Change?

By Matthieu Ricard | August 25, 2015

In an adaptation from his new book Altruism, Buddhist monk and bestselling author Matthieu Ricard takes on the notion that humans have a fixed nature.

 

Articles: Three Reasons Why You Can’t Always Trust Romantic Instincts

By Juliana Breines | August 6, 2015

When it comes to romance, do you trust your gut? That might not always be the best approach.

 

Articles: How Groups Shape Individual Judgment

By Art Markman | July 31, 2015

How social are people? New research suggests that we can go so far as to confuse our own actions with those of others.

 

Articles: Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.

 

Articles: What Drives Selfless Acts?

By Nathan Collins | July 20, 2015

Altruism has stumped researchers for years, but a new study finds that it may be as simple as choosing to be generous.

 
Worshippers embrace following a group prayer across the street from the scene of a shooting Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in Charleston, S.C.

Articles: Racism is Not a Mental Illness

By Jeremy Adam Smith | June 22, 2015

Many people argue that the white man who killed nine black people in Charleston must be mentally ill. What does the science suggest?

 
Adapted from The Upside of Stress (Avery, 2015).

Articles: How to Transform Stress into Courage and Connection

By Kelly McGonigal | May 13, 2015

Stress doesn't always lead to fight-or-flight, says Kelly McGonigal. It can also activate brain systems that help us connect with other people.

 

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December 9-10, 2016


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How Pleasure Works By Paul Bloom Bloom explores a broad range of human pleasures from food to sex to religion to music. Bloom argues that human pleasure is not purely an instinctive, superficial, sensory reaction; it has a hidden depth and complexity.

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Jon Kabat-Zinn

Best-selling author and founder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program

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