Tag: Evolution


Tag: Evolution

These are the most recent things on the site for the tag: Evolution. You can view more tags here.

Articles: Is Pride Really a Sin?

By Jill Suttie | October 14, 2016

According to a new book, we evolved to feel pride because it serves an important social function.


Articles: Altruists Have More Sex

By Tom Jacobs | September 12, 2016

According to a new study, people who give more get more (if you know what we mean).


Articles: Why Do American Soldiers Miss War?

By Jenara Nerenberg | September 1, 2016

According to author Sebastian Junger, facing social isolation back at home deepens the trauma.


Articles: Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

By Scott Barry Kaufman | August 4, 2016

A new study tries to measure the impact of reading on creativity and the motivation to write.

Explore awe in depth at The Art & Science of Awe, an inspiring day-long event on June 4 at UC Berkeley or via webcast.

Articles: Why Do We Feel Awe?

By Dacher Keltner | May 10, 2016

According to Dacher Keltner, there are important evolutionary reasons: It's good for our minds, bodies, and social connections.


Articles: How Happy Brains Respond to Negative Things

By Summer Allen, Jeremy Adam Smith | March 17, 2016

New research provides a whole new understanding of the brain's amygdala—and suggests that happy people take the bad with the good.

2015, Oxford University Press, 312 pages

Articles: How Altruistic is Your Brain?

By Jill Suttie | March 4, 2016

A new book argues that neuroscience findings suggest that altruism is not a response to moral authority, but rather a hard-wired instinct.


Articles: How Songs Help Children Bond

By Tom Jacobs | January 22, 2016

A new study suggests music plays a role in our early tendency to distinguish friend from foe.


Articles: Altruism is Sexy

By Tom Jacobs | January 15, 2016

In a new study, a kind heart trumps good looks—but the combination of both is the most desirable of all.


Articles: How Fear Hurts Us

By Jeremy Adam Smith | December 30, 2015

In the wake of terrorist attacks, American politicians are stoking fear of Muslims. But there's another, better way to respond to violence, argues Jeremy Adam Smith


Articles: How Our Brains Make Us Generous

By Summer Allen, Jill Suttie | December 21, 2015

A recent series of ground-breaking neuroscience studies suggest that empathy and altruism are deeply rooted in human nature.


Articles: The New Science of Singing Together

By Jacques Launay, Eiluned Pearce | December 4, 2015

Studies find that singing in a choir helps forge social bonds—and it might even make you healthier.


Articles: When Going Along with the Crowd May be Good for Teens

By Jill Suttie | December 3, 2015

A new study finds that focusing on the group as a teen predicts better health as an adult.


Articles: Why Does Therapy Work?

By Jill Suttie | November 10, 2015

A new book argues that talk therapy helps heal psychological wounds by making use of hardwired human needs for connection, understanding, and belonging.

Matthieu Ricard

Articles: Can People Change?

By Matthieu Ricard | August 25, 2015

In an adaptation from his new book Altruism, Buddhist monk and bestselling author Matthieu Ricard takes on the notion that humans have a fixed nature.


Articles: Three Reasons Why You Can’t Always Trust Romantic Instincts

By Juliana Breines | August 6, 2015

When it comes to romance, do you trust your gut? That might not always be the best approach.


Articles: How Groups Shape Individual Judgment

By Art Markman | July 31, 2015

How social are people? New research suggests that we can go so far as to confuse our own actions with those of others.


Articles: Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.


Articles: What Drives Selfless Acts?

By Nathan Collins | July 20, 2015

Altruism has stumped researchers for years, but a new study finds that it may be as simple as choosing to be generous.

Worshippers embrace following a group prayer across the street from the scene of a shooting Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in Charleston, S.C.

Articles: Racism is Not a Mental Illness

By Jeremy Adam Smith | June 22, 2015

Many people argue that the white man who killed nine black people in Charleston must be mentally ill. What does the science suggest?


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December 9-10, 2016

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Book of the Week

How Pleasure Works By Paul Bloom Bloom explores a broad range of human pleasures from food to sex to religion to music. Bloom argues that human pleasure is not purely an instinctive, superficial, sensory reaction; it has a hidden depth and complexity.

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"It is a great good and a great gift, this Greater Good. I bow to you for your efforts to bring these uplifting and illuminating expressions of humanity, grounded in good science, to the attention of us all."  
Jon Kabat-Zinn

Best-selling author and founder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program

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