Raising Happiness


Tuesday Tip: Embrace a Mistake

May 3, 2011 | Tuesday Tips | 0 comments

One thing you can do today to be happier.

Make an effort to embrace your mistakes as opportunities to learn.

Mistakes are a sign that we are putting ourselves out there and challenging ourselves; often, they are an important part of learning something new. Successful people are good at picking themselves up when they falter. When we celebrate our mistakes (rather than ruminating about them, or concealing them), we avoid the fear of failure that can inhibit our growth and happiness.

This week, embrace as many mistakes as you can. What did you learn from that blunder? How will you do things differently next time? And don’t forget to celebrate your children’s mistakes—learning how to recover from an embarrassing moment or minor failure is an important life skill.

© 2011 Christine Carter, Ph.D.

Become a fan of Raising Happiness on Facebook.
Follow Christine Carter on Twitter
Sign up for the Raising Happiness monthly newsletter.

Tracker Pixel for Entry

Like this post?

Here's what you can do:


Buy the Book!

Learn more about the science of raising happy kids in Christine Carter's popular book.


Subscribe to this Blog

Every time a new Raising Happiness post is published, get it as an email or via RSS feed.




Is she flirting with you? Take the quiz and find out.

Greater Good Articles




Greater Good Live


The Evolutionary Roots of Compassion

The Evolutionary Roots of Compassion

Dacher Keltner explains why Darwin thought compassion is humans’ strongest instinct.


The Greater Good Guide to Mindfulness

The Greater Good Guide to Mindfulness

This invaluable resource, a special benefit for GGSC members, offers insight into what mindfulness is, why it’s important, and how to teach it.

Get the Guide

Mindful Self-Compassion: Core Skills Training

International House
December 9-10, 2016
Mindful Self-Compassion: Core Skills Training

This workshop is an introduction to Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC), an empirically-supported training program based on the pioneering research of Kristin Neff and the clinical perspective of Chris Germer.

» All Events

thnx advertisement