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How to Be More Patient (and Why It’s Worth It)

By Art Markman | August 28, 2015

Research reveals why waiting just a little longer can lead to real benefits.

 
  

Past Stories

Gotham, 2015, 266 pages.

Can We Make Charitable Giving More Effective?

By Jill Suttie | August 27, 2015

Two new books argue that global philanthropy can get a lot better at helping the poor.

 

Three Lessons for Students from “The Prophet”

By Vicki | August 25, 2015

Discussing the new film adaptation of Kahlil Gibran’s timeless poems with students can help reveal the science of a meaningful life.

 
Matthieu Ricard

Can People Change?

By Matthieu Ricard | August 25, 2015

In an adaptation from his new book Altruism, Buddhist monk and bestselling author Matthieu Ricard takes on the notion that humans have a fixed nature.

 

How Kindness Can Define Who You Are

By Nathan Collins | August 24, 2015

Research on neurodegenerative diseases suggests that identity Is lost without a moral compass.

 
St. Martin's Press, 2015, 385 pages.

How Does Spirituality Grow in Children?

By Diana Divecha | August 21, 2015

A new book explores how to raise children with a sense of awe and transcendence. But does the evidence back up its claims?

 

How Loved Children Become Giving Adults

By Josh Elmore | August 20, 2015

A new study applies attachment theory to understand why some people donate more to charity than others.

 

How to Get Your Kid to Talk about What Happened at School

By Christine Carter | August 19, 2015

Our kids' lives are not our lives. Once you recognize that fact, says Christine Carter, you can start the conversation.

 

Why New Paternity Leave Policies Aren’t Enough

By Scott Behson | August 18, 2015

Is this the Golden Age of Paternity Leave? Not so fast. Here are tips for employees and managers to change their workplace cultures.

 

Is Becoming a Parent Really Worse than Losing Your Spouse?

By Jill Suttie | August 17, 2015

Media coverage of a new study suggests that parenting makes you really unhappy. But is that true?

 

What is the Relationship Between Stress and Empathy?

By Jeremy Adam Smith | August 13, 2015

A recent Greater Good article about anxiety and empathy triggered controversy among readers. But what does the science say?

 
Penguin, 2015, 277 pages

How is Technology Shaping Romance?

By Jill Suttie | August 12, 2015

Funnyman Asiz Ansari has written a serious, thoughtful book about online dating, and it's pretty good.

 

Four Activities for Building a Positive School Climate

By Vicki | August 11, 2015

Check out these research-based practices for cultivating staff well-being—a key to successful schools.

 

How Anxiety Reduces Empathy

By Kira M. Newman | August 10, 2015

A study suggests that stress and surprise can hurt your ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes.

 

Learning Might Buffer Brain Against Addiction

By Yasmin Anwar | August 7, 2015

A new study challenges the idea that addiction might be hardwired in our brains.

 

Three Reasons Why You Can’t Always Trust Romantic Instincts

By Juliana Breines | August 6, 2015

When it comes to romance, do you trust your gut? That might not always be the best approach.

 
Assistant Chief of Police Paul Figueroa, center, congratulates graduates after they are presented with their badges during the graduation ceremony for the 167th Police Academy at the Scottish Rite Temple in Oakland, California

Can Police Departments Reduce Implicit Bias?

By Paul Figueroa | August 5, 2015

Oakland’s assistant police chief says that law enforcement must work hard to reduce implicit bias and create a new path for police-community relations. But the problem is not intractable.

 

Just One Thing: Don’t Rain on the Parade!

By Rick Hanson | August 4, 2015

Rick Hanson asks: What kind of life would it be, never to rain on a parade, your own or anyone else’s?

 
Paul Piff

How Awe Makes Us Generous

By Adam Hoffman | August 3, 2015

A new study finds that feeling small in nature makes us more generous to other humans.

 

How Groups Shape Individual Judgment

By Art Markman | July 31, 2015

How social are people? New research suggests that we can go so far as to confuse our own actions with those of others.

 
Positive Psychology News, 250 pages, 2015.

What Are Your Strengths?

By Jill Suttie | July 30, 2015

Everyone has strengths. A new book explains how to find yours.

 
Carlos Arredondo helps a victim of the Boston Marathon bombing in April 2013. After Tsarnaev was sentenced to death, Arredondo expressed profound ambivalence about the verdict.

Is Vengeance Better for Victims than Forgiveness?

By Jason Marsh | July 29, 2015

In two high-profile cases of mass murder, some have argued that survivors and victims' families need the death penalty for a sense of closure. But is that really true?

 

Six Ways Happiness Is Good for Your Health

By Kira M. Newman | July 28, 2015

Need some extra motivation to get happier? Check out the ways that well-being has been linked to good health.

 

Are We Born Vengeful?

By Jenn Director Knudsen | July 27, 2015

A new study explores whether children are quicker to comfort a victim or punish the thief—and what this might reveal about human nature.

 

Three Tricks to Help Find Your Sweet Spot

By Christine Carter | July 23, 2015

Want more of that coveted state of ease, brilliance, and hyper-productivity? Here’s how to get it.

 

The Sleepless See Threats Everywhere

By Yasmin Anwar | July 22, 2015

A new study finds that the sleep-deprived brain can mistake friends for foes.

 

Free Your Mind and Your School Might Follow

By Jay Turner | July 20, 2015

A moving account of the lessons one teacher took back from our Summer Institute for Educators.

 

What Drives Selfless Acts?

By Nathan Collins | July 20, 2015

Altruism has stumped researchers for years, but a new study finds that it may be as simple as choosing to be generous.

 
Caitlyn Jenner (left, on the cover of Vanity Fair) won the Arthur Ashe Courage Award from ESPN. This triggered a social media uproar, with many arguing that it should have gone to U.S. Army veteran Noah Galloway (right), an athlete who lost an arm and a leg in Iraq.

When Courage Goes Bad

By Jeremy Adam Smith | July 16, 2015

Who gets to be brave? Researcher Cynthia Pury argues that courage is very much in the eye of the beholder.

 

Four Lessons from “Inside Out” to Discuss With Kids

By Jason Marsh, Vicki | July 14, 2015

The new Pixar film has moved viewers young and old to take a look inside their own minds.

 

A Better Way to Pursue Happiness

By Lahnna Catalino | July 13, 2015

Trying to be happy can be a recipe for unhappiness. But researcher Lahnna Catalino explains how to go about it effectively.

 

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Mindfulness, Connection, and Compassion

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Book of the Week

Altruism in Humans By C. Daniel Batson We lose time to save the whales and we lose sleep over a heartbroken friend. With this, Baston posits the remarkable thesis that we humans have the capacity to care for others for their own sakes.

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Best-selling author and founder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program

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